FAQs

Q

Can granite get chipped?

A.

Granite is one of the toughest stones available. In the case of normal wear and tear, it is not expected to chip. However, abusive use with heavy or hard materials can result in chips. The great news is that we can repair the chips in your granite. We do this by filling the chipped areas with material that blends seamlessly into the surrounding area.

Q

Is there routine, daily or weekly maintenance I should be performing?

A.

The #1 culprit of damage to marble, travertine, limestone and other natural stone floors is dirt (grit, sand & dust). The best treatment for your floor is a dry, untreated microfiber dust mop or vacuum used every day when possible. Damp mopping is recommended on a weekly basis and whenever there are visible spills.

Q

My floors had a beautiful shine when new. Can that shine be restored?

A.

Yes! If your floor is not deeply scratched, surface polishing may bring back an acceptable shine. However, existing scratches may remain. If your floor has worn badly, a complete restoration is warranted. This decision should be made between you and us.

Q

I have Marble Natural Stone floors in the kitchen. Some vinegar got on the floor and now we have a light spot. I believe that it is the sealer (polyurethane coating?) that got discolored. What is the best way to get rid of these dull spots and bring the normal shine back?

A.

When acid (vinegar) comes into contact with marble (calcium carbonate), it causes a chemical reaction. The result is called etching. Natural stone sealers penetrate the stone and do not prevent this natural reaction. If you do in fact have a polyurethane coat on top of your stone, then you have a different problem altogether. If the stone is etched, we can refinish it.

Q

I am having my marble floor restored. Will there be dust?

A.

Our process requires the use of water to lubricate our diamonds abrasives to cut the stone smoothly.This system creates no dust. If at any time we need to make a repair and cut something dry, all our tooling is encapsulated by dust capturing devices.